Port Townsend Foundry test pour of hydroperm 3D printed mold

co-authored by Laura West and Dave Feathers

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Recently, at the Solheim Lab, we sent a 3D printed mold printed in hydroperm off to Dave Feathers at Port Townsend Foundry.  The mold was placed in a greensand jacket and then poured in aluminum bronze.  The mold was not pre-heated, nor was it baked prior to pouring to push off all the moisture.  In spite of this, the results were quite impressive.
Port Townsend Foundry has been involved in 3D printing technology since they originally worked with the founder of Prometals.  As of late, Dave Feathers (design engineer and artist for the foundry) has been influential in the development of a new material from Viridis 3D (MIT technology), and has recently focused attention on Solhiem Labs and the groundbreaking work of professors Laura West and Mark Ganter.  Getting this new technology to mash with the manufacturing environment has been the relentless pursuit of Dave Feathers and Pete Langley (owner Port Townsend Foundry).  Pete comes from a lineage of brains,  starting with the guy who invented the theory of flight, another one who founded General Dynamics, and another who invented the spin casting fishing reel!  Pete Langley’s high quality castings have been sailing all over the world for the past 28 years.  The prototype in the photos is of a 5/8ths shackle which you will be seeing in the future aboard America’s Tall Ship, the USCG Barque Eagle.  Port Townsend Foundry already has outfitted her with blocks, jib hanks and spectacle irons.
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5 Responses to “Port Townsend Foundry test pour of hydroperm 3D printed mold”

  1. […] push off all the moisture.  In spite of this, the results were quite impressive.   Head over to rpsculpt for more pics and info. Posted by west Pictures Subscribe to RSS […]

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  3. […] part), for training (students need to be able to learn without racking up huge bills), for one-use foundry molds, and for large objects (which with Z Corporation powders would run quickly into the tens of […]

  4. […] helping others present their work,  innovate for 3dp efficiency, design and fabricate, casting of all sorts, education and training, co-working with rapid prototyping, and with the right combinations […]

  5. […] push off all the moisture.  In spite of this, the results were quite impressive.   Head over to rpsculpt for more pics and […]

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